Dadivank

This morning we woke up with the sound of bees around our tent. It’s not so hard to understand if you would see all the boxes with thousands of bees around the tent. We were camping with bee keepers in Artsakh. They spend the whole summer here and make high quality honey every day. The wild and unspoiled environment give the honey a unique taste.

We packed the tent after we had breakfast with the bee keepers. Just before we left we still got the chance to see and even try ourselves how they work.
Loaded with a few kilos of the best honey you can get, we descended back to the main road.

We turned left on the main road. We had no idea we had passed Dadivank already yesterday. Only a few kilometers further, Ani asked the driver of another car. He sent us back the same road we were driving. Even further back into Artsakh than the crossroad for the hot spring. But Dadivank is to important so we had to go all the way back.

And finally there was Dadivank village. A small and steep road goes up to the monastery. From the top of the monastery, there is a beautiful view over the roofs of the monastery complex with the valley and the mountains on the background.

On one of the facades of the monastery I noticed something I had seen already on other Monasteries in Armenia. Two man holding a model of the monastery.

It was time to go back to Yerevan.

We passed the border control point without any problems and drove along Vardenis, Martuni, Noratus and Sevan. Here we only had a short time to stop for a view on Sevan Lake and another quick stop at the medieval cemetery of Noratus. It has the largest cluster of khachkars in Armenia. The oldest khachkars in the cemetery date back to the late 10th century.

And here I finished my official plan of my trip to Armenia. All what was left to do now was returning my car in Yerevan and go back to Anush and her family. Actually, there was one more plan. I was not going to meet Anush at her home but at a football game of the Armenian Premier League. Together with Ani, we joined Anush at the football stadium, of which I don’t remember the name anymore, and watched Armenian football.

Watching Armenian football was something Anush and me had agreed we should definitely do while I was in Armenia. And so we made it true during my last hours in Armenia.

When Anush and me arrived at her home after the game, the table was filled with Armenian specialties prepared by the mother of Anush. Somehow, in Armenia they know how to make a visitor feel welcome. Anywhere at any time.

After the dinner Anush had to write a report about the football game. They offered me to sleep a few hours before I had to leave to the airport. I didn’t planned to sleep but a few minutes later I was sleeping anyway…

When they woke me up a few hours later, I noticed the whole family was still awake. It was around 2am. Anush, her father and her brother would bring me to the airport. So it was time to say goodbye to her mother. I don’t deny, an emotional moment.

When my luggage was checked in at the airport, it was also time to say goodbye to Anush and her brother and father.
It’s incredible how close you can get with people you’ve barely met.

I hope Anush can make it to Belgium one day, so at least I can return her the favor and host her in Gent.

My fifteen days in Armenia won’t end here. There will be a sequel.

Day 14Back to overview